Print Books

Over the last decade, I've published three books on how to utilize customer service concepts to help your school retain and attract students and thus improve your school's culture and success.

WHO CARES?: Improving Public Schools Through Relationships and Customer Service // 2007

Who Cares? is a call to arms for all proponents of public schools: administrators, teachers, support staff, and unions. It encourages schools to focus on the most important "R" of all relationships.

 

Many advocate the importance of relationships in a school, but few articulate how to systematically address it. Who Cares? offers hope with real world customer service examples and practices that have been implemented in one public school district in the battle to win back students. Readers can expect to find a variety of tools and resources, including:

  • Customer service ideas for all staff members (secretaries, coaches, bus drivers, custodians, cooks)

  • Home visits best practice checklist (K-12)

  • 29 ways for teachers to WOW parents and administrators

  • 10 of the best customer service practices borrowed from the business world and applied to public education

An intentional focus on customer service, relationships, and making connections will not only positively impact the culture of your school, but will also result in improved academic achievement.

SIMPLY THE BEST: 29 Things Students Say the Best Teachers Do Around Relationships //  2010

Simply the Best: 29 Things Students Say the Best Teachers Do Around Relationships highlights the importance of listening to students to inform our efforts in schools. Research shows that having an intentional focus on developing relationships in schools results in improved academic performance, reduced achievement gaps, safer schools and productive learning environments. Students should be more than passive participants in the educational process. They can articulate teacher behaviors that make a difference for them.

 

Simply the Best utilizes research to identify practices schools should consider to build better teacher-student relationships and enlists student voice in the form of student focus groups, and surveys, resulting in the identification of twenty-nine practices that characterize the best teachers.

 

Eighty ideas geared toward relationship building and the development of a customer service mind-set are shared as suggestions for teachers. Simply the Best serves as a reminder of the power of the teacher - the power of their words and actions in shaping students' educational experience. The teacher and student relationship is the foundation for school improvement efforts.

COMPETING FOR KIDS: 21 Customer Service Concepts Public Schools Can Use to Retain and Attract Students // 2018

When was the last time you reflected on the quality of customer service your school gives to your students?

As alternate forms of education become more prominent, public education faces the challenge of losing its best and brightest students to the competition.

Competing for Kids is a full-service manual for giving great customer service throughout your school district. By implementing the concepts in this book, public schools can become more appealing and more successful in retaining and attracting students.

Competing for Kids teaches:

  • How the best companies use customer service to compete at the highest level

  • How these twenty-one business concepts can help public schools better compete with other forms of education

  • How to develop a district-wide customer service plan for all staff members working in the public school arena

Competing For Kids gives examples of great customer service from top companies including The Walt Disney Company, Google, Apple, Southwest Airlines, Amazon and more. In an educational environment where schools have to fight for each student, learning and implementing customer service concepts from those who do it best can improve a school's appeal for current and prospective students.